9:18 pm - Sunday August 20, 2017

‘Mommy’s Book’ launched at BSPID organized symposium

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To obtain information related to a newborn’s health, growth and vaccination, renowned pharmaceutical company Sanofi Bangladesh Limited inaugurated ‘Mommy’s Book’ – a mobile application for new parents. The pharmaceutical company has also launched Miacottra- a vaccine for preventing meningococcal disease. This was done at a symposium on detection, treatment and prevention of invasive meningococcal disease in children, organized by the Bangladesh Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases (BSPID), on Monday at the Krishibidh Auditorium in the capital. These were unveiled by National Professor Dr. M R Khan, and present at the time was French High Commissioner Sophie Aubert, BIRDEM’s Director General Prof. Dr. Nazmunnahar, BPA President Prof. Dr. Muhammad Shahidullah and BPA Secretary General Prof. Dr. M A K Azad Choudhury.

Bangladesh Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases (BSPID) with support from Sanofi Bangladesh Limited organized a symposium on detection, treatment and prevention of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in children at a local convention hall. On the occasion Sanofi Bangladesh inaugurated ‘Mommy’s Book’- a mobile application for the new parents that can help them to keep track of the health, growth and vaccination schedule of their children. The pharmaceutical company has also launched Miacottra- a vaccine for preventing meningococcal disease.

Meningococcal disease describes infections caused by the bacterium Neisseria meningitidis (also termed meningococcus). It carries a high mortality rate if untreated but is a vaccine-preventable disease. In his speech Prof. (Dr.) Manzoor Hossain, President, BSPID said, “While best known as a cause of meningitis, widespread blood infection can result in sepsis, which is a more damaging and dangerous condition. Meningitis and meningococcemia are major causes of illness, death, and disability in both developed and under-developed countries. Meningococcal vaccines can sharply reduce the incidence of the disease as it has been seen in developed countries.”

The main dilemma with IMD is its signs and symptoms are almost like other meningitis. Most children have non-specific symptoms in the first 4–6 hours. However, the condition may rapidly progress to death, even in those who receive early antibiotic treatment and up to 2 out of 10 survivors have permanent complications. The best way to protect the smile of our children is to vaccinate them. Chief Guest of the symposium National Professor Dr M R Khan said that, for a country like Bangladesh, where treatment options are limited and patients have to bear the treatment cost, prevention is a more viable solution. He also highlighted the success of EPI programs of Bangladesh that helped us irradiate disabling diseases like Polio, Diphtheria, Pertussis, etc.

Thanking BSPID for organizing the symposium and Sanofi for supporting BSPID, Her Excellency Mrs. Sophie AUBERT, Ambassador of France to Bangladesh said, “ Children are the future- the root of any nation. Their protection is of utmost importance. France has always stood in front line when it comes to Sustainable Humanitarian engagements. I am proud that Sanofi is upholding this same thought by bringing their world class products in Bangladesh for the betterment of the society.” On behalf of Sanofi, Dr. Riad Mamun Prodhani, Managing Director said that Solidarity is a part of Sanofi’s vision. We are proud to be associated with BSPID for such noble endeavour.

In the scientific session of the program, the key-note on ‘Update on Meningococcal disease: Prevention and Treatment’ was delivered by Professor Samir Kumar Saha, of Bangladesh Institute of Child Health.

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